Should Your Cats Sleep With You?

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Should Your Cats Sleep With you

Letting your cats snuggle in your bed at night is a personal decision, with many pet parents either firmly for or against the practice. But do you know how your cat feels about the idea of hanging out on your bed at night? The answer may surprise you!




According to cat expert Dr. Lynn Bahr, it’s natural and normal for cats to want to be with us when it’s time to shut off the lights. She notes that, “During the first few weeks of their lives, kittens stay tightly knitted together for warmth, security and safety. For many, it is a habit they retain into adulthood choosing to curl up next to their owners for the same companionship and comfort they had when they were young.”

That’s all well and good, but what if your cat thinks that bedtime is playtime? Here are some tips to help you and kitty enjoy a snuggle while also getting a restful night’s sleep!

First off, having a sleepy cat when bedtime rolls around solves many nocturnal problems. Keeping your cat active during the day is key to insuring that he’s ready to slumber at night. Have toys that he likes to play with by himself readily available: puzzles with snacks inside are a sure-fire way to get him active! If you’re able to, play with kitty before it’s time to go to bed, and he’ll learn to associate the session with bedtime.

Do you ever get sleepy after a good meal? Of course you do, and the same principle applies to your BFF! Providing food before bedtime will encourage his natural instincts to nap after a meal.

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Once you and your fur baby are settled in for the night, how do you keep him peaceful and quiet? If your favorite cat thinks it’s fun to jump on you, bite at your toes, or cry to get your attention, there are a few things you can do to discourage these habits.

Related: The Science of How Cats Form Relationships

First off, do not let your cat think that he’s being rewarded for waking you up. Playing, feeding, or talking to your cat sends the message that waking you up is ok. Since he misbehaves to get your attention, not giving it to him discouraged his actions. If you do need to get up after he’s awakened you, avoid contact for at least 10-15 minutes so that he doesn’t associate his behavior with your attention. If that doesn’t work, remove him from your room and shut the door!

We’d love to hear how you get your feline friend to “sleep tight” at night, let us know your tips and suggestions!

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